This Female Razor Brand is Trying to Remove the Stigma Around Upper Lip Hair on Women

Photograph courtesy of YouTube/Billie

Billie is back at it again.

It’s likely you’ve heard of buzzy US razor brand Billie before. The brand has made waves over the past year with its fun ads that aim to take down taboos regarding women and body hair.

Having previously tackled unibrows, pubic hair and stomach hair, the brand is now trying to encourage women to embrace their facial hair, specifically their moustaches. And it’s for a very important cause, too.

Next month marks the start of Movember, the month-long fundraiser for prostate and testicular cancer. Historically, fundraising efforts have only been targeted towards men but Billie is trying to change that. The brand has announced that it will match 100 per cent of contributions (up to $50,000) for every woman who grows out her moustache in support of the cause.

A new video announcing the initiative states, “Our hair has a very important announcement to make: Women have moustaches too. The world may not know this because we go through a lot to hide them; we’ve been hiding them all our lives. But newsflash, we’ve got them.” The clip shows a variety of women sporting upper lip hair, combing it out, and adorning with eyebrow gel. The brand found the models via an Instagram call-out.

Georgia Gooley, the brand’s founder, told HuffPost, “We’re hoping to destigmatize upper lip hair and empower women to feel confident with having hair there. We’d love it if having a moustache was just as normal for women as it is for men.” The clip ends with the women saying, “‘Cause a stache is a ‘stache, and we shouldn’t let our perfectly good ones go to waste.”

The brand’s approach to marketing and body hair is unconventional for a razor company to say the least. But it’s deliberate. In an interview with Glamour, Gooley explained, “When brands pretend that all women have hairless bodies, it’s a version of body shaming. There has been this shame around body hair, and a lot of that is the shaving category talking about the topic as a problem that needs to be fixed with the product they’re trying to sell. We didn’t want to be part of that conversation.”